Leveson: What future for Data Protection?

LevesonThe Leveson Report has finally been published.

The Report recommends that a tougher form of self-regulation backed by legislation should be introduced to uphold press standards. Much has already been written (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20543936) and will continue to be written about this central recommendation and whether it is good or bad for democracy and a free press. But amid the furore about whether the Prime Minister should or should not accept the central recommendation, it is easy to forget that the report will also have implications for Data Protection Act and the Information Commissioner.

One of the areas that Lord Justice Leveson was required to consider was ‘the extent to which the current policy and regulatory framework has failed, including in relation to data protection’.

I started writing a blog post on the way back from London, and got as far as the above, when an e mail from the good people at 11KBW  (Panopticon Blog) landed in my inbox.

On well if you can’t beat them, read them! Here is their excellent analysis of the DP recommendations of Leveson:

http://www.panopticonblog.com/2012/11/29/leveson-inquiry-report-spotlight-on-proposed-data-protection-reforms/

I was only training round the corner and passed the QE2 centre where LJ Leveson was giving his press conference. Perhaps, I should have camped out overnight to beat the Panopticon Team?

This entry was posted in Data Protection, ICO, Privacy and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Leveson: What future for Data Protection?

  1. Reblogged this on #Hashtag – Thoughts on Law, Technology, the Internet, and Social Media and commented:
    Leveson: What future for Data Protection?

    The Report recommends that a tougher form of self-regulation backed by legislation should be introduced to uphold press standards. Much has already been written (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20543936) and will continue to be written about this central recommendation and whether it is good or bad for democracy and a free press. But amid the furore about whether the Prime Minister should or should not accept the central recommendation, it is easy to forget that the report will also have implications for Data Protection Act and the Information Commissioner.

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