New Data Sharing Powers in the Digital Economy Bill

illust_01_e

Much has been written about the complexities of the current legal regime relating to public sector data sharing. Over the years this blog has covered many stops and starts by the government when attempting to make the law clearer.

The Digital Economy Bill is currently making its way through Parliament. It contains provisions, which will give public authorities (including councils) more power to share personal data with each other as well as in some cases the private sector.

The Bill has been a long time coming and is an attempt by the Government to restore some confidence in data sharing after the Care.Data fiasco. It follows a consultation which ended in April with the publication of the responses.

The Bill will give public authorities a legal power to share personal data for four purposes:

  1. To support the well being of individuals and households. The specific objectives for which information can be disclosed under this power will be set out in Regulations (which can be added to from time to time). The objectives in draft regulations so far include identifying and supporting troubled families, identifying vulnerable people who may need help re tuning their televisions after changes to broadcasting bands and providing direct discounts on energy bills for people living in fuel poverty.
  2. For the purpose of debt collection and fraud prevention. Public authorities will be able to set up regular data sharing arrangements for public sector debt collection and fraud prevention but only after such arrangements have been through a business case and government approval process.
  3. Enabling public authorities to access civil registration data (births, deaths and marriages) (e.g. to prevent the sending of letters to people who have died).
  4. Giving the Office for National Statistics access to detailed administrative government data to improve their statistics.

The new measures are supported by statutory Codes of Practice (currently in draft) which provide detail on auditing and enforcement processes and the limitations on how data may be used, as well as best practice in handling data received or used under the provisions relating to public service delivery, civil registration, debt, fraud, sharing for research purposes and statistics. Security and transparency are key themes in all the codes. Adherence to the 7th Data Protection Principle (under Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA)) and the ICO’s Privacy Notices Code (recently revised) will be essential.

A new criminal offence for unlawful disclosure of personal data is introduced by the Bill. Those found guilty of an offence will face imprisonment for a term up to two years, a fine or both. The prison element will be welcomed by the ICO which has for a while been calling for tougher sentences for people convicted of stealing personal data under the DPA.

The Information Commissioner was consulted over the codes so (hopefully!) there should be no conflict with the ICO Data Sharing Code. The Bill is not without its critics (including Big Brother Watch) , many of whom argue that it is too vague and does not properly safeguard individuals’ privacy.

It is also an oversight on the part of the drafters that it does not mention the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which will come into force on 25th May 2018. This is much more prescriptive in terms of Data Controllers’ obligations especially on transparency and privacy notices.

These and other Information Sharing developments will be examined in our data protection workshops and forthcoming webinar.

Illustration provided by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (www.priv.gc.ca)

This entry was posted in Data Protection, Data Sharing, Personal Data and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to New Data Sharing Powers in the Digital Economy Bill

  1. Pingback: GDPR: Goodbye Notification, Hello More Fees! | Blog Now

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s